Backyard Buddies

Ground Frogs

Bumpy Rocket Frog

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Photo credit: Alexandre Roux

Bumpy Rocket Frog

The Bumpy Rocket Frog is a great little frog to look out for in the north of Australia, in Darwin backyards and particularly in northern Queensland. Another name for this frog is the Floodplain Frog because it comes out in great numbers after heavy rains. The Bumpy Rocket Frog has a very warty problem, which is how he got his name. It might look like a toad when you first glimpse it but have a closer look because unlike toads, this ..

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Common Eastern Froglets

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Photo credit: Matt Clancy

Common Eastern Froglets

If you live in eastern Australia, you may hear a tiny little frog chatting away, trying to attract a mate. Common Eastern Froglets are very small, only 1.8 to 3 cm long, and are the most common and widespread frog in south-eastern Australia. Common Eastern Froglets are frequent backyard visitors. They'll happily live in and around garden ponds, pools, and ditches of water in suburban and urban areas. They are just as common in rural..

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Eastern Banjo Frogs

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Photo credit: Matt Clancy

Eastern Banjo Frogs

All across eastern Australia, near large ponds or lakes, the distinctive calls of the Eastern Banjo Frog can be heard. Like nature's own bluegrass band, once the Banjo Frogs get going, you'd swear you were hearing musical instruments, rather than a pudgy 8 cm long amphibian looking for a mate. Instead of a croak, their call is a resounding 'bonk' It is usually repeated every few seconds, but sometimes a whole crowd will produce a rap..

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Green and Gold Frog

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Photo credit: Tereza T

Green and Gold Frog

If you ever spot the distinctive pointed snout, golden iris and olive-brown to bright emerald-green body of a beautiful Green and Gold Frog - consider yourself lucky. There aren't as many of them around as there were only a decade ago and they are listed as endangered in NSW. These frogs mainly live in the north of Tasmania, and in small remnant pockets in the south and east of the state. Green and Gold Frogs also live in south-eastern Au..

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Motorbike Frog

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Photo credit: FNPW Image Library

Motorbike Frog

The Motorbike Frog gets its name from the sound it makes - like a motorbike changing gears, followed by some growls and croaks. As one of the most commonly seen frogs in south-western Australia, especially in Perth gardens, it's also one of the most entertaining. Click to watch a video of a Motorbike Frog calling at night. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9zuJWib-dE) Motorbike Frogs are large, growing up to 10 cm, with long back ..

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Spotted Grass Frog

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Photo credit: Sunphlo

Spotted Grass Frog

The Spotted Grass Frog, also known as a Spotted Marsh Frog, has a distinctive tiny golden iris and a round, black pupil. This frog lives in a wide range of areas, including Tasmania, Victoria, New South Wales, Queensland, parts of South Australia and in Kununurra in Western Australia. It can live along the wet coast or even in the dry interior of Australia - it's a great survivor. Spotted Grass Frogs are extremely quick to move into ..

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Striped Marsh Frog

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Photo credit: Ken Stepnell OEH

Striped Marsh Frog

Around November each year, you might hear the Striped Marsh Frog's distinctive call. During spring and summer, males either call from the water or hidden places, such as under leaf litter or rocks. The distinctive mating call is a single 'pop', 'toc' or 'whuck' repeated once every few seconds. You will find them along the eastern coast of Australia, from northern Queensland to Tasmania. Striped Marsh Frogs lay masses of eggs which ..

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Western Banjo Frog

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Photo credit: Aussie Oc

Western Banjo Frog

When winter chills are gripping the land, Western Banjo Frogs are getting set to call all through the night in south-western Australia. If you're in Perth, listen for their Banjo -like calls coming from the backyard, especially if you've got a pond or are close to a wetland or waterway. Around your area, you may hear a single explosive 'bonk' ring out from a hidden spot in the dense undergrowth at edge of a stream, lake or other body..

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