Backyard Buddies

Big Backyard Buddies

Australia is one of only 12 'megadiverse' countries that together account for 75% of the world's total biodiversity. Scientists estimate that the continent is home to more than one million plant and animal species.

Big Backyard Buddies are important - so that’s why we have a special section about some not so average Backyard Buddies.

Australian Fur Seal

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Photo credit: Hans Hillewaert

Australian Fur Seal

It would be pretty alarming to wake up to find a fur seal in your backyard, but they are our ocean buddies. The Australian fur seal is the most common seal in Tasmanian waters: however, it is the fourth rarest seal species in the world. They live around Bass Strait, Tasmania, southern Victoria and southern South Australia but can venture as far north as NSW. They spend most of their time in the sea and come ashore to breed on rocky islan..

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Freshwater Crocodile

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Photo credit: Richard Fischer

Freshwater Crocodile

It is pretty unlikely that you will find a freshwater crocodile in your backyard but it is not uncommon if you live near their habitat. The freshwater, or Johnstone’s , crocodile, lives in inland creeks, rivers, lakes and swamps across northwest Western Australia to northern Queensland. They are shy animals and not considered dangerous to humans although will bite if you accidentally jump on top of one in a river! They mainly eat fish, crusta..

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Little Penguins

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Photo credit: M Kuhn

Little Penguins

Little Penguins are also called fairy penguins. They are the smallest type of penguin in the world. They weigh just 1 kg and are only 30–40 cm tall. While excellent swimmers, they cannot fly. Often they have the same mate for life. Both parents feed and care for the young, who leave the nest at 7–9 weeks and live for up to 7 years. There is a colony of Little Penguins living in the middle of Sydney – at Manly. Little Penguins ..

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Platypus

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Photo credit: Matt Chan

Platypus

The Platypus is brown in colour and quite small. An adult Platypus can be from 45 cm up to 60 cm in length and can weigh up to 2.7 kg. Male Platypuses have a poisonous spur on the inside of their hind legs. The spur contains a poison that the Platypus uses to defend his territory from other males and enemies. Platypuses dig two burrows; a nesting and a resting burrow. Burrows can be up to 20 m long. Burrows can be hard to find as the ..

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