Backyard Buddies

Factsheets for Reptiles

Blue Tongue lizard

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Photo credit: Peripitus

Blue Tongue lizard

Blue tongue lizards are one of the largest lizards found in many Australian backyards. With their bright blue tongues, you will recognise them straight away. Baby blue tongues do not hatch from eggs but are born fully formed. They can live for more than 20 years and reach over 50cm in length. While young, they are vulnerable to currawongs and kookaburras but their greatest threat is from uncontrolled dogs and cats. Female blue ton..

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Eastern Water Dragon

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Photo credit: Stu's-Images

Eastern Water Dragon

Eastern water dragons are grey-brown in colour with black banding, and some have a red belly and chest. Usually a broad black band extends through the eye. A crest of spines runs from the head to the tail. Water dragons are different from all other lizards – they have four well-developed limbs, each with five claws, and a tail that is longer than the body. Water dragons eat berries and flowers from native trees if insect numbers are ..

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Freshwater Crocodile

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Photo credit: Richard Fischer

Freshwater Crocodile

It is pretty unlikely that you will find a freshwater crocodile in your backyard but it is not uncommon if you live near their habitat. The freshwater, or Johnstone’s , crocodile, lives in inland creeks, rivers, lakes and swamps across northwest Western Australia to northern Queensland. They are shy animals and not considered dangerous to humans although will bite if you accidentally jump on top of one in a river! They mainly eat fish, crusta..

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Skinks

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Photo credit: David Cook

Skinks

Most suburban backyards are home to a variety of skinks, but they look similar at a glance. Due to their timid nature and quick reflexes you may only ever see them dashing for cover as you approach. Skinks don’t have to eat every day, but will do so when conditions are favourable. They create nests in moist soil under objects in the garden. Females lay about five eggs each, sometimes in communal nests which hold dozens of eggs. Eggs l..

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